Jesse Ventura in 2008

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Jesse Ventura in 2008

Postby palmspringsbum » Sat Mar 22, 2008 11:56 am

The Liberty Tree wrote:Topic: Presidential Campaign 2008

Jesse Ventura Confirms
Consideration of Presidential Run in 08

<span class=postbigbold>Former WWF star and Governor of Minnesota in his own words.</span>

The Liberty Tree
by Jake Morphonios (Conservative Libertarian)
March 14, 2008

Former Minnesota Governor Jesse "the Mind" (aka "the Body") Ventura has a new book coming out, entitled: "Don't Start the Revolution Without Me!". In the book, which is scheduled to be released on April 1st, Ventura writes:

"...I'm facing probably the most monumental decision of my 56 years on this planet. Will I run for president of the United States, as an independent, in 2008? Or will I stay as far away from the fray as possible, in a place with no electricity, on a remote beach in Mexico?"

Ventura goes on to say, "My outrage knows few bounds. I can't live with this apathy. I can't tell myself it's not happening."

Les Kinsolving of World Net Daily reported that Jesse Ventura enjoyed the highest approval rating (73%) of any Governor in the state's history.

A blogger by the handle of "The_Bammo" wrote:

"He is solidly pro-choice, no friend of religion (even vetoed a Pledge law), has stated approval for legalizing prostitution, approves of medical marijuana, supports public transportation and actively supports gay rights. His administration was even amenable to public school funding, just not the teachers' union. He has stated opposition to trade sanctions with Cuba."

Ventura is a strange blend of liberalism and libertarianism. Would he have the support of Libertarians? Or would his neo-liberalism be too much for more classic libertarian adherents?

Either way, Ventura may add flavor to what is turning out to be an exceptionally bland Presidential race between statists and socialists.

Oh, yeah. I almost forgot. Go Ron Paul!

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Where the votes are

Postby palmspringsbum » Sat Mar 22, 2008 5:20 pm

The Los Angeles Times wrote:
Where the votes are

<span class=postbigbold>Americans treasure freedom; the party that gets serious about giving us liberty will win the future</span>

The Los Angeles Times
By Nick Gillespie and Matt Welch
March 20, 2008

Since the 1970s, the Democrats and Republicans have been leaking market share like a Chevy Nova leaking oil. In 1970, the Harris Poll asked: "Regardless of how you may vote, what do you usually consider yourself -- a Republican, a Democrat, an Independent, or some other party?" Fully 49% of respondents chose Democrat, and 31% called themselves Republicans. In 2006, the latest year for which data are available, those figures were 36% for Democrats and 27% for Republicans. With that gap closing, it's not surprising that presidential elections have become battles over voters who identify with neither party.

Libertarians, for instance. As David Boaz of the Cato Institute and David Kirby of America's Future Foundation note in a study of public opinion polls, roughly 15% of the electorate can be considered libertarian. Such folks are fiscally conservative and socially liberal. They like gays and guns, low taxes and free speech. They are pro-globalization and antiwar. They are at the center of American politics. Win them over and you'll win every national election for the next several decades. Here are some smart -- and popular -- policies that will appeal not only to libertarians but to other centrist voters fed up with budget-busting compassionate conservatives and nanny-state buttinsky liberals.

<ul class=postlist><li> <span class=postbold>Let patients smoke dope.</span> In the mid-1990s, a number of states, including bellwether California, passed ballot initiatives and legislation allowing use of medical marijuana. The federal response, first under Bill Clinton, later under George W. Bush: Send armed feds to raid dispensaries that are legal under state law and harass glaucoma patients with zero criminal records. The first party to denounce this buzz kill can expect a 72% approval rating from Americans who favored medical pot in an AARP poll.</li>

<li> <span class=postbold>Ban the use of eminent domain for private gain.</span> A vile 2005 Supreme Court decision, Kelo vs. City of New London, touched off a grass-roots rebellion, with dozens of states and municipalities passing laws to protect against eminent domain abuse. Polls consistently show that up to 90% of Americans are appalled at the idea of officials pushing homeowners off their property to aid big developers.</li>

<li> <span class=postbold>Legalize online gambling.</span> At least since the mid-1970s, betting has been something Americans love to do. A 2006 poll found that 78% of Americans believe the government should not "restrict what adults do on the Internet in the privacy of their own homes." Yet the feds are waging an unwinnable war on online gambling -- even incurring a World Trade Organization sanction for jailing the head of a legal, Britain-based operation when he changed planes in Dallas.</li>

<li> <span class=postbold>Make the Internet tax moratorium permanent.</span> Speaking of online freedom, the Internet Tax Fairness Act of 1998 banned state and local governments from levying sales and access taxes in cyberspace. That was back in the days before the Net economy -- and telecommuting and various other adjunct activities -- had become a mass phenomenon. Every few years, the moratorium comes up for renewal. The party of the future -- even the party of today -- will be the first one to make the ban permanent.</li>

<li> <span class=postbold>Grant amnesty -- er, citizenship -- to illegal immigrants.</span> Neither Democrats' fears that unskilled arrivals drive down union wages nor GOP concerns about assimilation are borne out by facts. Most new arrivals go to places with hot economies, and Spanish-speaking households go English-only at the same pace as previous waves of Jewish, Italian and Polish immigrants. Besides, a 2007 USA Today/Gallup Poll found that 59% of Americans believe that illegals should be allowed to become citizens if they meet minimal requirements.</li>

<li> <span class=postbold>Bring the troops home, already.</span> For the last year, about two-thirds of Americans have opposed the war in Iraq. Even the modest success of the surge -- a tactical issue, not a strategic one -- hasn't diverted attention from the fact that this was an elective, undeclared war that leaders in both parties enthusiastically endorsed.</li>

<li> <span class=postbold>Decouple health insurance from employment.</span> At a time when every business trend is hurtling toward flexible working conditions, constant job-shopping and project-based assemblages of freelancing humans, both parties are doubling down on an employer-based healthcare system. We retain an expensive, regulation-choked system that assumes company-town-style job security from cradle to grave.

Give consumers more control over their health coverage, health providers more leeway to provide flexible products and employers the option -- not the duty -- to offer coverage as a perk, and you'll be acknowledging that we indeed live in the 21st century. Last one through the door gets stuck with the $100 co-pay.</li></ul>

Nick Gillespie is editor of reason.tv and Reason Online. Matt Welch is editor in chief of Reason magazine. This is adapted from an article in the April issue of Politics.

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